MOTEL FOR SALE IN WASHINGTON - SALE IN WASHINGTON


Motel For Sale In Washington - County Inn Suites.



Motel For Sale In Washington





motel for sale in washington






    washington
  • A state in the northwestern US, on the Pacific coast, bordered by Canada; pop. 5,894,121; capital, Olympia; statehood, Nov. 11, 1889 (42). By agreement with Britain, Washington's northern border was set at the 49th parallel in 1846

  • a state in northwestern United States on the Pacific

  • Capital: the federal government of the United States

  • The capital of the US; pop. 572,059. It is coextensive with the District of Columbia, a federal district on the Potomac River bordering on the states of Virginia and Maryland. Founded in 1790, during the presidency of George Washington, the city was planned by engineer Pierre-Charles L'Enfant (1754–1825) and built as the capital. Full name Washington, DC

  • the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791





    for sale
  • purchasable: available for purchase; "purchasable goods"; "many houses in the area are for sale"

  • For Sale is the fifth album by German pop band Fool's Garden, released in 2000.

  • For Sale is a tour EP by Say Anything. It contains 3 songs from …Is a Real Boy and 2 additional b-sides that were left off the album.





    motel
  • A roadside hotel designed primarily for motorists, typically having the rooms arranged in a low building with parking directly outside

  • a motor hotel

  • A motel is a hotel designed for motorists, and usually has a parking area for motor vehicles. They are common in the United States.

  • Motel is the debut album by the Mexican soul-rock band, of the same name. The album was released in March 28, 2006, in Mexico, their homeland. And later, after four months, the album was released in countries like Guatemala, Venezuela, Chile, and the United States.











San Juan River




San Juan River





Read two books: The Incredible Mission by Lamont Crabtree. Also The Very Hard Way - Bert Loper and the Colorado River by Brad Dimock.

I didn't read books in high school and college (including my assigned textbooks, which made it tough at times to pass a course). But when I started traveling internationally on business, I couldn't stand the thought of sitting in an airplane for hours, without something good to read. So I started reading in earnest, finding out how much I had missed by skipping that exercise in my school days.

Now reading the history of a place, hopefully before I visit it, or even after a visit, brings a much better feel, understanding and appreciation for what I get to see on my travels and hikes.

The Incredible Mission tells the story of the gutsy, tough, and well organized Mormon settlers went through to travel the route that we now know as the Hole In The Rock Road in the Escalante River canyon country. They took wagons, kids, and livestock over the rim of the canyon, crossed the Colorado River, then took even tougher terrain on, to get to the present site of Bluff, Utah. Here they attempted to stay, raise crops, livestock and families.

But only one thing defeated them. This quiet innocent looking river (the San Juan), flooded them out. It has repeatedly flooded out even the best of homesteading and mining efforts along its shores. You would never know its capabilities by looking at it on a day like the one I took this photograph.

The other story is of a pioneer white water river runner...Bert Loper. He would one day learn (along with others), that the keeled boats (the Whilehalls), used by Wesley Powell, weren't the right design for white water river travel. He would also learn that running the rivers "stern first" so you could row up and across the river to slow your passage through rock strewn rapids, was the best and only way to do it. Powell and his men not only had the wrong boats (22 foot keeled Whitehall boats), but they ran the rapeds bow first, rocketing down through each one with their backs to the course they needed to negotiate.

If you visit the goosenecks of the San Juan River (as I have done several times), it will take on a new look, when you know the story of Bert Loper's attempt to live and make a living mining the river bottom, on the isthmus you see as you look across at the main "gooseneck" of the San Juan River.

I hope I have made a sale with some who might visit Southern Utah, without first learning a few of the "stories" that go with the "scenery".

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
May 12th through May 19th - - I traveled 9 states in 8 days, camping, driving back roads, visiting scenic and historic sites, and taking some great day hikes. These are some of the photographs from this solo "road trip".

Day One: Home in Eastern Washington; Mountain Home, Idaho; Owyhee, Nevada and a very cold night camped at Wild Horse Crossing south of Mountain City, Nevada.

Day two: NEVADA - - Mountain City; Elko; Wells; Ely (through a snow storm); Panaca. UTAH - - Enterprise, Veyo, to a warm and scenic enjoyable camp and hiking at Snow Canyon.

Day three: UTAH - - Snow Canyon; St. George; Hurricane; to Fredonia, Arizona. Forest Service Road #22 and many others to places like Monument Point and Indian Hollow. Too cold to camp (got down to 19 degrees that night), so dropped down low to BLM wilderness land off 89 A and spent the night among sagebrush and juniper with curious mule deer as "neighbors".

Day four: Opening day of the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park. Visited the park and arriving early had many places (Cape Royal), entirely to myself. ARIZONA: Vermillion Cliffs; Page; Kaibito; and Navajo National Monument and Betatakin, where I had my nicest camp site (Canyon View at Betatakin).

Day five: Betatakin camp to Kayenta; Monument Valley to drive the 17 mile "loop road" through the monument; to Mexican Hat to recharge my camera battery (Canon G10) while eating Navajo stew and fry bread at a cafe along the San Juan River; to Comb Ridge where I took two short enjoyable "rock art and cliff dwelling" hikes (procession panel and Monarch Cave ruins; up to Blanding, Utah where I checked into a small motel for two nights.

Day six: Get up early and hike a bit over 14 miles down Kane Gulch; down Grand Gulch to Todie Canyon, with many side excursions to visit cliff dwellings, granaries, rock art sites, etc. Weather started to blow in by the time I finished my hike.

Day seven: Changed my mind with the weather. Instead of heading for the Bisti Wilderness (for the first time) and Chaco Canyon (for the third time) - - I headed north through Moab then turned east toward Grand Junction, Colorado. Stopped at Sego Canyon rock art site outside of Thompson Springs, Utah. COLORADO - - Grand Junction, Rifle, Craig. WYOMING - -Baggs, Rawlins, Lander, Dubois (where I got a real nice motel room for a reasonable











Over 500 miles bike ride to Idaho. Sept - Oct 2007




Over 500 miles bike ride to Idaho. Sept - Oct 2007





P9180207. Photo:On the Washington Gorge past Maryhill heading East

A Bike tour From Portland (Troutdale) to Bonner's Ferry, Idaho. Eleven days of riding 530 miles (plus 40 miles of hitching). The return was made on the Empire Builder Amtrak train at Sandpoint, ID.

For the tour Matt and Carye bought new custom built Bike Friday (www.bikefriday.com) folding bikes that are made in Eugene, Oregon. Neither Carye or Matt own cars, so investing in a reliable, flexible bike for travel was important. However the bikes arrived two days before leaving, so getting used to new bikes while on the road, was literally a pain in the butt! By the end of the trip, gears, seat and handle bar placement, and proper riding shoes were figured out. Everyday of the ride had awesome weather (not too hot, not rainy), and Carye and Matt met many friendly people, ate as much pizza and icecream as desired, and enjoyed some beautiful scenery (though Washington wheat fields get dull to the eyes after 20 miles). The fourth day brought bad luck - 4 flats (at once!) caused by Goathead thorns, and wind in the face most the day. Also a family of earwigs hitched a ride in C & M's camping gear, and it took about a week to finally see the last one. Idaho is a cyclist paradise (what a secret). From The State Border near Coere D'Alene to just before Bonner's Ferry, there were many bike paths, nice scenery, and most flat routes.

Day 1:Troutdale to Hood River (55.6 miles)
Highlights: Gorgeous Columbia River (Get the bike map from ODOT). Ride to Council Crest, Ride by Falls, bike-ped paths on the old historic highway.

The campground listed on the bike map for Hood River was not there. We decided to treat ourselves and stayed at the Hood River downtown hotel. Hood River is a super nice town - though sad the Carousel Art Museum is closed and moving elsewhere. Also on this route, between Cascade Locks and Wyeth, do not take the Wyeth Bench Rd (aka Herman Creek Rd), it is a horrible grade hill, and you are better off taking the I-84. Note about I-84, it's not the most pleasant experience, but it's not bad, In order to bike to Hood River, you will need to get on I-84 at several points - The shoulder is pretty wide at most places, and it's a good idea to wear some bright orange!

Day 2: Hood River to Maryhill, WA (52.5 miles)
Highlights: The old historic highway section is really neat: it goes through the Mosier Tunnels (now just for ped/bike), The section through Mosier town, and to Rowena's Crest was on low traffic streets. No need to get on I-84 at all all the way to the Dalles.

The crossing over to Washington on the bridge in the Dalles was difficult. It was so windy and the sidewalk so narrow we had to walk. Biking to hwy 14 across the wind was also difficult. But once on hwy 14 heading East, the wind was at our bikes, and we cruised past the Maryhill Museum (Too late in the day to stop!) and stayed at the Maryhill State Park (back down by the river).

Day 3: Maryhill to Crow Butte (58.2 miles)
Highlights: Cruising sometimes 20 miles an hour easily with the wind at our back on Hwy 14. Lovely more deserty scenery, waving to trains. A Stop at Stonehenge.

From the campground, we hitched a ride in a pickup back up the top of the hill to hwy 14. The road was a major truck route, and the shoulder was pretty much missing for the first section of the hill, we decided htiching was the safest option. We enjoyed stopping at America's Stonehenge. I had been there before, but never thought I'd bike all the way! Crow Butte park was father than we thought. We could see it, but then had to ride about 4 miles all the way around and out to it. The RV park was expensive, and did not offer "primitive camper" sites.

Day 4: Crow Butte, WA to Hat Rock Park, OR
Highlights: Early morning hike past deer to the top of Crow Butte. Discovering the way over the I-82 - there is a bike route, but you need to go on the may freeway before the bike route appears, then you exit, cross under and go over on the otherside. Umatilla was nice little town to check out. At first we were excited about the Lewis & Clark Bike/Ped Bath, but it turned into a bad situation.

The wind in the gorge changed from E to W today, so we had to push hard for 20 miles, going about 5-8 miles an hour. Very hard reality after the day before. The road moved away from the Gorge and was now less interesting. Onion (Walla Walla) trucks passed us all day, leaving onion skin trails. We crossed back to Oregon, and instead of the main road decided to follow the Lewis & Clark trail to Hat Rock State Park. Unfortunately it turned into a bad idea. The path was badly marked and kept changing from paved to shared road, to bark-dirt to gravel. After a gravel section we discovered that we had rode through thorns and had 4 flats at once. We pulled out 15-30 thorns and only had two new tubes, One tube needed to be patched 7 times. We were able to ride out to the main road and hitched a ride with









motel for sale in washington







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